Evidence submission

What makes good evidence?

What makes good evidence?

Different types of evidence can be submitted depending on what the claim is for. Here are some of the most important examples.

 

 

Signed check-in and check-out inventory reports

The adjudicator will use the inventories to compare the property condition at the beginning and end of the tenancy - without it, they’re highly likely to reject the landlord’s claim. For a more detailed look into signed check-in and check-out inventory reports, click here

Good evidence for: non-payment of rent, cleaning, damage to property, gardening, outstanding utility bills, contractors’ fees for maintenance, wear and tear

 

 

Signed tenancy agreement

As a bare minimum, a landlord should provide a signed copy of the tenancy agreement with their evidence for the adjudication to proceed. This is essential for virtually all disputes and without it, it's possible a landlord’s claim may be rejected as the adjudicator won’t be able to establish their contractual obligations.

Good evidence for: non-payment of rent, cleaning, damage to property, gardening, outstanding utility bills, contractors’ fees for maintenance, wear and tear

 

 

Signed reports of periodic inspections of the property

It’s sensible for the landlord to carry out periodic inspections of the property. It’s an opportunity to make sure the property is being maintained, and to identify any potential issues that could cause friction between the tenant and landlord, or result in a dispute. These reports don’t need to be as detailed as the check-in and check-out reports but can add useful evidence in the event of a dispute. Make sure any required follow-up is sent to the tenant in writing.

Good evidence for: non-payment of rent, cleaning, damage to property, gardening, outstanding utility bills, contractors’ fees for maintenance, wear and tear

 

 

Invoices/estimates/receipts and quotes

These will illustrate costs for many types of claim, including repairs or restoration, redecoration, replacement of damaged goods, gardening, cleaning and waste disposal that has been required. Where possible, the contractor should itemise their costs, with a breakdown of the costs for each type of work undertaken. 

Good evidence for: non-payment of rent, cleaning, damage to property, gardening, outstanding utility bills, contractors’ fees for maintenance, wear and tear

 

   

A statement of the rent account

Rent account statements are important when the claim involves rent arrears, as they will help the adjudicator understand what payments were owed, what payments were made, and what payments were missed. They should clearly show the property and person to whom the account relates, and provide a breakdown of how the rent arrears are calculated.

Good evidence for: claims relating to the payment of rent.

 

 

Date stamped photographs or video recordings

‘Before and after’ photographs allow adjudicators to see the reason for the claim. They should be submitted with an explanation of what the photograph is showing e.g. colours, item description, marks on surfaces etc. Photos must be good quality and clearly show the alleged damage or defect.

Photographs should be submitted in the clearest possible format.  If you have digital copies of the photos, submit them in this format so that the adjudicator can see them on screen.  The adjudicator will then also be able to check the digital properties of the photograph to confirm the dates when they were taken.  If you can’t provide digital copies make sure the printed versions are as clear as possible, and that you confirm the dates when they were taken.

Good evidence for: non-payment of rent, cleaning, damage to property, gardening, outstanding utility bills, contractors’ fees for maintenance, wear and tear

 

 

Copies of any correspondence between the landlord and tenant

Correspondence can be useful for the adjudicator to establish a timeline of events. For example:

> when repairs were reported

> when repairs were completed

> what was agreed between the parties

> admissions of liability or

> service of notice

 

 

Witness statements

Witnesses, such as independent contractors, surveyors’ reports or third party agencies can have useful information for the adjudicator to consider regarding a claim. Landlords and tenants can both submit witness statements, or letters to support their claim. The adjudicator won’t contact witnesses to obtain further evidence, cross-examine them, or take evidence under oath.

 

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